designweekportland:

Share Document is a collection of writings on design, edited by Clifton Burt and Nicole Lavelle, and published by Ampersand on the occasion of Design Week Portland 2013. The book is available for purchase here. With big thanks to the editors and contributors, we’re sharing the essays that were published last year here on the blog.


Ten Lessons Graphic Designers Learn That Every Artist Should Understand

By Jen Delos Reyes

I have spent the past five years co-directing an MFA program at Portland State University focused on art and social practice. The program is based on a foundation of access, community, collaboration and engagement. It values and acknowledges multiple forms of knowledge, and embraces an interdisciplinary approach to contemporary art. The mantra of the program could easily be that art and social practice starts and ends not in rarefied spaces, but out in the world. The program educates and activates students to develop and utilize their artistic skills to engage in society. It is the kind of learning that creates engaged citizens.

I believe that the fairly recent interest in and proliferation of art programs that focus on what is being referred to as either art and social practice, public practice, or community arts is in part because these programs propose not only alternate forms of sustainability for an art practice outside of market constraints, but promote the multitude of ways artists can function in the world. However the majority of these programs are at the graduate MFA level only, which is highly problematic.

I believe that an artist’s relationship to and placement in society should not be an area of specialization, or afterthought, but instead a core component of the education of all artists. Because I believe that all artists need to contemplate and consider context, publics, and relationships, I have recently been making the argument that art and social practice needs to be taught at a foundations level. As much as artists are pushed to develop craft and hone in on concepts, they should be thinking about context, publics, and social function. This should be the basis of all art education today.

Read More

designweekportland:

A person made this
By Sean Schumacher.
There are names imprinted into most sidewalks around Portland. Street names past and present, yes, but there are other names, too: the name of the sidewalk’s paver, or at least the crew they were working for, and the year the concrete was set. They’re nearly everywhere and, for five years, I’ve been collecting those stamps.
I promise, the whole thing is more exciting than it sounds.
Read More

Thanks to Taryn Cowart for asking me to write this! designweekportland:

A person made this
By Sean Schumacher.
There are names imprinted into most sidewalks around Portland. Street names past and present, yes, but there are other names, too: the name of the sidewalk’s paver, or at least the crew they were working for, and the year the concrete was set. They’re nearly everywhere and, for five years, I’ve been collecting those stamps.
I promise, the whole thing is more exciting than it sounds.
Read More

Thanks to Taryn Cowart for asking me to write this! designweekportland:

A person made this
By Sean Schumacher.
There are names imprinted into most sidewalks around Portland. Street names past and present, yes, but there are other names, too: the name of the sidewalk’s paver, or at least the crew they were working for, and the year the concrete was set. They’re nearly everywhere and, for five years, I’ve been collecting those stamps.
I promise, the whole thing is more exciting than it sounds.
Read More

Thanks to Taryn Cowart for asking me to write this! designweekportland:

A person made this
By Sean Schumacher.
There are names imprinted into most sidewalks around Portland. Street names past and present, yes, but there are other names, too: the name of the sidewalk’s paver, or at least the crew they were working for, and the year the concrete was set. They’re nearly everywhere and, for five years, I’ve been collecting those stamps.
I promise, the whole thing is more exciting than it sounds.
Read More

Thanks to Taryn Cowart for asking me to write this!

designweekportland:

A person made this

By Sean Schumacher.

There are names imprinted into most sidewalks around Portland. Street names past and present, yes, but there are other names, too: the name of the sidewalk’s paver, or at least the crew they were working for, and the year the concrete was set. They’re nearly everywhere and, for five years, I’ve been collecting those stamps.

I promise, the whole thing is more exciting than it sounds.

Read More

Thanks to Taryn Cowart for asking me to write this!

Earlier this month, my friend Lexa Walsh embarked on a residency as an Artist Fellow at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, ensconced in research on archives and initiatives in the Bay Area and trying to locate not just who creates things, but also who holds on the notes, sketches, photos, ephemera, and other printed matter after the projects themselves end. She’s shared with participants loaned archival material otherwise unavailable to the public and hosted lectures from artists and archivists, allowing visitors to organize and understand how seemingly unrelated parts of San Francisco’s past tie into each other and into the present. Too, she’s been building her own archival institution, constructed in the form of a giant chalk and paper timeline on one of the gallery’s walls that draws out nearly 80 years of contributed and discovered markers of importance for the region’s culture.

I’m happy to have gotten the chance to build the online component of Mapping the Archive—mappingthearchive.com—which, in a sense, will act as an archive of the archive map of the project long after the wall itself has been painted over. There’s definitely still more work to be done, but I’m pleased to get this history of the Bay Area out into the world to be explored well by those who can’t get to the de Young in time themselves to be a part of it (myself included).

cardboardamerica:

6th Ave. Motel - Portland, Oregon

"Downtown West Side Portland"
-Heated Swimming Pool-
Room controlled radiant heat - Room telephones - Television - Refrigerated air conditioning. AAA Approved. A Member of the Best Western Motels.
2221 SW 6th Ave. CA 6-2979
Portland 1, Oregon

The card was mailed from Portland, Oregon to Irene Price of Tulsa, Oklahoma on October 1, 1960:

Hi!
We are going to Spokane, Wash. this afternoon. I am a real mountain driver now. Having a wonderful time. See you all in about a week or 10 days. Tell the cats hello for me.
Josephine

The same week as our Open House event over at the PSU School of Art and Design, I’ll be guest curating the April edition of Getting to Know YouTube at the Hollywood Theater! The event this month will be on Monday, April 14 at 7:30pm and I managed to find three of the most amazing and brilliant individuals I know to present: Briar Levit, Jessica Hickey, and Stacey Tran!

For more information, check out Facebook or the Hollywood’s own page for the event.

The PSU School of Art and Design is throwing its second annual open house two weeks from today—Thursday, April 17 from 5–9pm—and to celebrate, the School is pulling out some of the best work of every department. Likely for completeness’ sake more than anything else, I will also be there with some of my weird interventions and installations created as part of my time as Resident Artist for the School in January.

Speaking of which, I’ve been posting more and more of the "Art, building" projects onto my site over the past few weeks. If you didn’t get to stop by the gallery during January and are wondering some of what I’ll be sharing during open house, or if you just want to see institutional critique depicted through the least thrilling animated GIF ever made, it might be worth a second look.

While I spent most of my January residency exploring the pasts and futures of the Art Building itself at Portland State, one future was considerably more well sealed by the time I started: that of the Candlelight Room, a building formerly attached to the south side of AB and now a swath of concrete and some bike racks facing a widened SW Lincoln Street. My final performance paid tribute to the building using its own swan song (sung by jackhammers), but I didn’t really address what that place was during its existence, nor what it had been to those who knew it, partly because I never had.

Jack Berry at Oregon Music News was once a regular there, and shared a few stories of the place he knew as Sidney’s (it wouldn’t become the Candlelight until 1974). Unfortunately, he died before finishing it. Though incomplete, his article begins to tell a story that connects the destructive urban renewal effort that leveled this part of South Portland with those that did the same to much of Albina and notes Matt Groening’s father Homer was among the club’s regulars.

Just released! My special thanks go out to PSU University Communications’ Peter Simon for putting together this very nice profile of Art, building and the residency in general.

portlandstate:

image

Resident Artist Sean Schumacher creating eraser dust in the Lobby Gallery of the Art Building. 

You only have 2 more days to see his work "Art, Building"! So get on it! Also, check out his tumblr seanschumacher

(via pdxtheater)

The School of Art+Design has a lack of exhibition spaces generally, and a lack of white box exhibition spaces lacking windows totally. Rather than attempting to transform one space to suit both needs, I instead combined two. The white, plywood box hanging above the AB Lobby Gallery (presently disguising an air conditioning duct and some rather unfortunate pigeons) serves as the sort of space the actual gallery below with its two walls of windows couldn’t ever be: a blank canvas for a viewer to experience work in as they enter the room. The second space, a closed utility closet with exposed wiring similarly disguising an air conditioning duct that takes up almost the whole of the room, serves as the windowless exhibition space.

Currently on view is Mark Martinez’ ”I can’t ever imagine loving you” (2014). It’s a two part experience—the remote exhibition on AB Lobby Gallery’s “white box” is strictly visual. The third floor, where the space is actually located, is inaccessibly save for sonically. The sound of nature, or a strangely condensed snippet of what nature might have sounded like if foley artists were creating it, is audible through the door of room 301.

Art, building

It’s hard to get much of a feel for what kind of place our Art Building is from the name alone. At a first reading, “Art Building” seems little more than a utilitarian label, which is, perhaps, fair—a visitor might better recall it as a sandbar in a river of construction, whose orange-hued façade represents the ubiquity of the construction barricades that surround it better than the creative practices inside. Beneath those panels, beyond the traffic cones, and within the halls that have been shaken by jackhammers and bent to the needs of the three art schools that it’s served, though, there exists far more than simply an arbitrary building that happens to serve our community of makers.

Rather, the Art Building might itself be better considered as a work of art, building over time with every dent in a wall or stain on a carpet—an utterly flexible space of collaborative creativity that’s being constantly redesigned, over and over, to suit the needs and whims of its inhabitants in intentional and unintentional ways. Every action enacted upon it is an iteration of our vision for what this place can and should be, and the work those panels represent grows with every artist that builds something new from it. Few, though, have understood how the building’s marks tell its story.

Through a series of micro-exhibitions, short performances, workshops, interventions, and exchanges of both space and purpose, I’ll react to the issues we face in remaking this building as a home, combining that which can be retrieved from its past with the indexes of change that can be scavenged from its present.

Art, building, part of my time as the first-ever Resident+Artist program for the School of Art + Design at Portland State University, will run weekdays from January 6–23 at the Lobby Gallery of the Art Building at PSU.

I hope you can find a way to stop by.

Are you an upper-division graphic design student looking for an opportunity to work with real clients in an agency-style studio environment while also making the Portland State University School of Art + Design a better place to be? Apply to join A+D Projects next term!

Kate Bingaman-Burt, Briar Levit, and I are looking for some talented folks who can problem solve in an experimental studio set up to support the arts at PSU. In the first term its existed, they’ve created a unified visual style for the galleries, begun work on Open Engagement 2014’s look and feel, branded the Studio MFA program, started redesigning our already amazing PSU.gd site, and have been working with me on an exciting project to-be-announced later this year. Next term promises to be even bigger and more exciting! Applications for winter term, available from our new site adprojects.co, are due by December 2.

To raise money for PSU’s MFA Studio Visiting Artist Lecture Series, alumni and friends of the program are donating works to be auctioned off in the Art Building on Friday, November 22nd from 5–10pm. I donated two works of mine to lend a hand—one being the complete set of pirate editions of Las Vegas history books that I collected in 2012, and the other a personalized performance piece about the disquieting notion that growing portions of our personal communications may never be lost to history again.

Prices are low, and there’s works by far better artists than myself up for grabs with crazily low starting bids, so if you want to snap up some nice art while also supporting a worthy cause, I hope to see you at AB two Fridays from now.